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WTM

Story of the World Volume 3 Notebooking Pages

Do you use Story of the World in your homeschool?

We are now in our third year of using Story of the World, and we LOVE it! It is so well written, engaging, and has been a great education for both my children and myself! Our history lessons have always included discussion and narration of the material, and my daughter now enjoys looking over her history notebook and reviewing all that she has learned.

For the first two years, I wrote her narrations down for her and then had her illustrate them. She used to be quite resistant to writing and looking back, I’m so glad now that I didn’t require her to write much.

Being her scribe allowed her to love history for history sake while still being able to keep a record of her learning so that she could look back on all she had learned. She truly loves history, and is so much more knowledgeable than I ever was (and maybe even am)!

But as she is increasing in skill and maturity, I have been gently urging her on to more independence in her work — and she has recently taken over writing her own narrations, without a word of complaint! She’s quite pleased with these narration pages I created for her and thinks they are a great improvement on the plain lined paper we were using previously.
Story of the World Volume 3 Notebooking Pages. Get your free, 80 page download!

 

Printable Story of the World Volume 3 Notebooking Pages

Today I’m excited to be sharing my printable notebooking pages for Story of the World Volume 3 with my readers! I hope they will be a blessing to you and that your children will enjoy using them.

Each Notebooking Page Features:

  • the chapter title
  • the section headline
  • a co-ordinating illustration (painting/sketch/photograph)
  • a lined area for your student (or you!) to write a short narration
  • a blank box for him to draw his own illustration

Printable Story of the World Volume 3 Notebooking Pages.

Story of the World Volume 3: Early Modern Times Notebooking Pages are now available in my Subscriber Only Library — free as a thank you to my newsletter subscribers.  Enter your email address into the box below to receive access!

Looking for More Story of the World Resources?

Free, printable, Story of the World Volume 4 Notebooking Pages.

The Ultimate Guide to Using Story of the World in Your Homeschool - exhaustive list of resources for SOTW booklists, lapbooks, timelines, notebooking, and more!

More History and Printable Resources From the Bloggers of iHomeschool Network:

The Massive Guide to Homeschooling History - Story of the World Volume 3 Notebooking PagesFree Homeschool Printables Week from the Bloggers of the iHomeschool Network

 

Poetry Memorization with First Language Lessons Level 3 {FREE PRINTABLE}

This post contains affiliate links. Please see my disclosure policy for details.

It’s certainly no secret that I love Peace Hill Press and their products! We have been using their phonics primer since Big Sister was in Kindergarten, and their grammar, writing, and history curricula for three years and are very satisfied.

A key component of their grammar program, First Language Lessons, is poetry memorization. Being exposed to, and especially memorizing poetry helps to feed the mind with beautiful language. Children have a wonderful capacity for memorization! I’m constantly amazed at how quickly my children memorize scripture and poetry, and that Little Sister is memorizing most of her older sister’s selections passively without any effort or intention on my part.

I recently prepared some poetry printables for our Morning Time binders — and today I’m happy to be sharing them with you! If you are using FLL 3 or are looking for some poetry to memorize in your homeschool, download your own First Language Lessons Level 3 Poetry Printables by clicking the link or the image below.  Watch for upcoming posts sharing more about our Morning Time, Morning Time binders, basket,  and memorization in our homeschool!

Poetry Printables: Free poetry memorization printables for First Language Lessons Level 3 (FLL3)

You may also be interested in my Parts of Speech Printables, great for use with First Language Lessons 1,2 & 3, as well as my First Language Lessons Memory List Printables. All my other printables can be found on my Printables page.

Do you have any favourite sources for poetry memorization? I’d love to hear about it!

Classically Homeschooling

 

 

Top 5 Favourite Homeschooling Books

This post combines two of my very favourite things: homeschooling and books! Today I’d like to share with you my top 5 recommendations for homeschooling books — especially if you’re after a literature rich, classically leaning, wholesome education for your children. I’ve read a lot of homeschooling books — as many as I could get my hands on through our public libraries, but these all have a permanent home in my own personal library.

Must Read Homeschooling Books - these are my top 5 recommended books for new homeschoolers

 

The Well Trained Mind by Susan Wise Bauer

I list this book first because it is the single, most used reference book in my homeschooling library. I began by checking this book out regularly from the library, was constantly renewing it, requesting it, etc. until I decided that I just needed my own copy. It provides a good insight as to the why of homeschooling your child, but even better, it explains the how. This book was my first taste of classical education, and it had me hooked from the beginning. It lays out in a simple format the progression of a child’s learning through the various stages of the trivium (which it names grammar, logic, and dialectic), and what and how to teach each level. It is full of practical information, including such things as approximate length of time to spend on each subject, curriculum recommendation and how to organize your child’s notebooks. This book is gold, and I need another copy just to loan out to friends because I recommend it so much!

For the Children’s Sake by Susan Schaeffer Macaulay


For the Children’s Sake is a lovely read which introduced me to many of the educational principles of Charlotte Mason. What I really appreciate about this book is that it puts the relationship into education. This is the furthest thing from current textbook, workbook, one-size-fits-all, and checklist education models we see today. I love the focus on building habits, relationship, and appetites in our children as the basis for education. There is so much loveliness in this book!

 

 

 

Educating the Wholehearted Child by Clay Clarkson

This book focuses on educating the heart of your child, and educating them with the motive of helping them to become the person God has made them to be. It sets forth home education primarily as discipleship, which I really love. It is quite Charlotte Mason-y in many ways, but refers to books as “wholehearted” instead of “living” as do the Charlotte Mason educators. It’s definitely the same thing though. There are also many examples from the Clarkson’s own experiences home educating their four children as well as inspirational quotes, recommended reference and literature books, and practical forms and helps. This book is a good combination of inspiration and application.

 

102 Top Picks for Homeschool Curriculum by Cathy Duffy

This book is purely practical. It is a great starting point for people who are new to homeschooling as it provides overviews of teaching styles, educational models, and learning styles as well as providing comprehensive curriculum reviews. It is perfect for helping you decide what to use based on your own preferences and the needs of your children.

 

 

 

 

Honey For a Child’s Heart by Gladys Hunt

This is such a lovely book! It is not a homeschooling book per se, but it is an amazing resource as you search for quality books for your children. This book is so helpful in selecting books that will furnish your child’s imagination with beauty, wonder, delight and adventure. It discusses role of reading and books in giving your children a large view of the world, encouraging imagination,  and developing good use of language. It has booklists with over a thousand recommendations organized by age and subject including both classics and new books. In my opinion, this book is a must read for parents who want their children’s hearts and minds to be positively influenced by the books they read.

 

 

iHomeschool Network Must Read Books

What are your top picks for homeschooling books?

This post is linked up at Trivium Tuesdays and the Hip Homeschool Hop

 

Five Reasons I Love Peace Hill Press!

If you’ve seen my curriculum choices, you will have noticed I use a lot of Peace Hill Press’ products! We are currently using Ordinary Parent’s Guide to Teaching Reading, First Language Lessons, Story of the World, and Writing With Ease.  Here’s what I love about their programs:

 

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Classical

Peace Hill Press is led by the authors (Jessie Wise and Susan Wise Bauer) of The Well Trained Mind: A Guide to Classical Education at Home. This book is among those I consider to be the most influential both in my decision to homeschool and in my overall educational philosophy. PHP’s products follow the methodology set forth in TWTM’s particular flavour of classical education.

Teacher Friendly (Open & Go)

You most definitely can homeschool according to TWTM without using PHP’s programs. There are many other curricula recommended in the book aside from their own, as well as information on how to put together your own course of study. Before I started homeschooling formally, I planned on using relevant passages from our history and literature selections for narration, dictation, and copywork. While I still think this is ideal, as a new, busy, and inexperienced homeschooler I decided to go with their prepared writing curriculum which uses selections from children’s classics.  No preparation required.  FLL, OPGTTR, WWE, and SOTW are all well scripted and easy to use. Of all their programs, SOTW requires the most prep and even that I find minimal. I request the recommended supplemental books from the library a few weeks in advance and make photocopies of maps, templates, and colouring pages. That’s it! If there is a craft or activity I want to do with the kids, I do have to assemble the materials.

Non Consumable and/or reproducible

As a homeschooling parent with multiple children, I really appreciate this! I can photocopy extra colouring pages for my 4 year old without violating copyright, AND use the whole program again with her when we cycle through history with her later. The WWE & FLL workbooks also allow copying for use within your own family. FLL 1 & 2 and OPGTTR are also completely non consumable. So once you purchase a given level of any of their materials, you’re good to go for the rest of your children!

Affordable

Peace Hill Press’ products are not costly. For example, OPGTTR can be purchased for less than $20. Compare that to leading phonics programs that requires teacher’s manuals, student worksheets, manipulatives or readers. PHP materials can also be purchased on Amazon, unlike many other homeschool curriculum that must be purchased either directly from the publisher or from homeschool/educational suppliers. This means free shipping and no duty, which for me as a Canadian is definitely a plus! While I do recognize that you may be able to provide your child with a first rate education solely with a library card and an internet connection, the cost of purchasing curriculum from PHP is small compared to the cost of some of the boxed curriculum providers which cost around $1 000/year per child!

High Quality, Simple & Effective!

It is amazing to me how simple, yet effective their programs are. My first daughter learned to read using OPGTTR just a few short years ago and now there is no stopping her! When you are finished with that book, your child is reading at a 4th grade reading level. Which for her was early in the first grade. I love the emphasis on focusing on the basics in the early grades and building skills rather than emphasizing creativity which the child will be better able to express once they have mastered the basic skills required for doing so. I’ve only seen the fruit of two years of writing and grammar instruction, but I am amazed so far!

 

Some other things about Peace Hill Press that may appeal to you:
  • Their books are available for PDF download offering both financial savings and ease of use for printing those reproducible work pages.
  • The have high quality audio companions for many of their products, most notably The Story of the World read by Jim Weiss. He’s so talented and a treat to listen to!
  • They now offer “School in a Box” with all the recommended curricula including those not published by themselves. They are currently offering Kindergarten through Second Grade packages.
Are you a Peace Hill Press user? What do you like most about their products?

 

This post contains affiliate links.

 

This post shared on Trivium Tuesdays and The Hip Homeschool Hop.

 

Favorite Curriculum 2016
 

Classically Homeschooling

First Language Lessons – Memory List Printables

Poetry memorization hasn’t been much of a problem for us, and we have really enjoyed working through the selections in Levels 1 & 2 of First Language Lessons for the Well Trained Mind. Less enjoyable, but still easily accomplished were the parts of speech definitions. We have, however, been hitting quite a roadblock with the memorization lists for pronouns, state of being and helping verbs, conjunctions, articles and prepositions. Oh, the prepositions! There is nothing fun about these lists!

I can’t believe we have gotten this far in the program and I am just now taking the plastic off the Audio Companion CD and putting it in the CD player! I bought the older, combined Level 1 &2 edition used for $5 a few years ago, and the lady I bought it from also threw in the CD, and she hadn’t used it either.  And it turns out it’s really good! It may be late in the game, but we are going to be using it from now on. Even the 4 year old was starting to recite the prepositions at odd times during the day, and I’ve also caught myself singing “These are the prepositions we sing about!” while I’m puttering away in the kitchen. The guitar and lyrics by Mike Smith are really enjoyable, and surprisingly not annoying!

Here are the memorization lists I prepared for Big Sister’s grammar notebook, to follow along with the chants and songs on the CD:

First Language Lessons Printable - Memory lists (articles, prepositions, state of being verbs etc)

 

You may also find my Parts of Speech Prints useful, as well as the Poem Printables  available from Homeschool Creations.

 

What have your children found the most challenging to memorize? Are you seeing the benefits of memory work for your students?Free Homeschool Printables Week from the Bloggers of the iHomeschool Network
Classically Homeschooling

Parts of Speech Printables

Are you looking for a visual aide to use with your grammar memory work? I’ve created these lovely prints to co-ordinate with our grammar curriculum, First Language Lessons, that are both practical and lovely. No reason to have hand copied or simple typed cue cards!

 

Beautiful parts of speech prints! Conjunctions
Revised and corrected Conjunction card 🙂

Parts of speech print - noun FREE Printables Parts of speech prints - adjective FREE printables Parts of speech print - adverb FREE Printables Parts of speech print - interjection FREE Printables Parts of speech print - pronoun FREE Printables Parts of speech print - preposition FREE Printables Parts of speech print - sentence FREE Printables Parts of speech print - synonyms FREE Printables Parts of speech print - verb FREE Printables

 

Simply right click on the images and save the files to your computer, and upload to your photo finishing website or print at home!

Enjoy!

 

 

Classically Homeschooling

FREE Printables {Round Up}

Ditching What Doesn’t Work and Finding What Does

When we began our first-grade spelling lessons last year, it took me a little while to figure out that what we were doing wasn’t working for my daughter. Did she protest when I brought out her spelling book? No. Did she drag her heels and take forever to complete her work? No. Was she enjoying her lessons? Yes, she was. So what could possibly be the problem? While I want my children to enjoy their learning, a smiling face isn’t always the best indication of a successful learning experience. You see, learning has to actually happen!

This post contains affiliate links. Please see my disclosure policy for details.

When choosing and planning our studies, I always consult my trusty copy of The Well Trained Mind. I’ve already mentioned that I love this book and it has greatly influenced my educational philosophy and material selection. I lean heavily toward the classical camp of homeschooling, but I also appreciate many of the other approaches especially Charlotte Mason.  Anyways, I think that the WTM really misses the boat on this one. My copy, the newest edition available, recommends Spelling Workout.  The problem we had using Spelling Workout was that there didn’t appear to be much rhyme or reason to how it was teaching spelling. And that it wasn’t really TEACHING anything actually. It seems to be your standard workbook and might work well for some kids who are already good spellers. But it failed to teach my daughter ANY spelling rules and suffice it to say that my daughter had zero retention of any of the material covered. I would hazard a guess that if the WTM is ever revised a fourth time it will recommend All About Spelling.

I must say that I was totally wrong in believing that a child who reads well, loves books and is exposed to quality literature will automatically spell well.

So after our SWO flop last winter, I started looking into other options. There is a lot of buzz in homeschool circles about All About Spelling. Everywhere I looked people were recommending it and All About Learning Press’ reading curriculum All About Reading.  I hesitated in purchasing the curriculum though, for two reasons: the first being that I had never seen or handled the curriculum myself; and second that it is a very costly program. Spelling Workout A can be purchased for $18, and each subsequent workbook is approximately the same cost. To get started with AAS in comparison, you need to plunk down $29 for a starter kit and then $38 for Level 1. Subsequent levels are in the ballpark of $50 each! And then you have to factor in shipping from a curriculum supplier as it is not available on Amazon.

So I spent the winter trying to do spelling on my own. I have zero knowledge of spelling rules and am myself not a great speller. There are graded spelling lists available online, and these I taught in the method commonly in use in public schools (according to a friend who is both a parent of young elementary children and a public school teacher). At the start of the week, I would do a pretest. My daughter would get approximately 5-7 out of 10 words correct. On day two she would copy the words. On day three she would alphabetize the list. On day four she would build the words with letter tiles. I was trying to add some multi-sensory experience to our learning a la AAS 😉 I used these tiles. On the final day, I would re-test her. And this is where it got interesting – she would get the same or almost the same score as she had on the first day BUT SHE DIDN’T ALWAYS SPELL THE SAME WORDS WRONG! She was often spelling words incorrectly that she had previously gotten right. And vice versa.

So after several months, we quit spelling altogether and I just kept thinking about AAS.

This fall I had the opportunity to purchase the AAS Basic Interactive Kit (starter kit) and Level 1 used. So I jumped on it and we have been enjoying it. And most importantly, my daughter is LEARNING from it. So am I, and that my friends, is what this learning mama is all about! We have cruised through Level 1 which I think is about a first-grade level, and are one lesson away from being finished. So without further ado, I will show you how we have been using our All About Spelling Level 1:

Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com
We begin with REVIEW

We begin each lesson by reviewing our Phonogram Cards, Sound Cards, and Key Cards. Then we review 10 spelling words from our cards in the “mastered” section. I try to shuffle them well so there is a good mix of all the recent rules we have learned.

Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com
Pleased with her hard work!
Ditching What Isn't Working and Finding What Does - our experience switching from Spelling Workout to All About Spelling www.learningmama.com
First step of learning a new concept – using the letter tiles to build the words

Next, I demonstrate the new teaching using the letter tiles. The letter tiles are really great – read all about why they are so great on the All About Learning Press Blog. Then my daughter practices a few words using the tiles. The instructor’s guide specifies that the student is to spell all 10 words in the list using the tiles before moving on to writing them by hand. Since my daughter is finding the words really easy and doesn’t like using the tiles very much, I allow her to move along quite quickly to writing. She loves the dry erase markers!

Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com
After learning the new concept using the tiles, we practice with the markers. Today we learned to make words plural by adding s or es. Here she is erasing the e she added in error to the word “truck”.

The last step in each lesson is dictation. At this point I dictate to her a few of the phrases, she repeats it back to me and then writes them down. This is working really well for her as we have just begun dictation in both our writing and grammar programs. Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com And when we are all done, my daughter enjoys making a picture out of the words! She decorates the board to her heart’s content and then little sister has the fun of erasing the whole thing.Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com And just in time, look what came in the mail this week! Level 2 &  3 which I ordered from The Learning House:Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com Ditching What Doesn't Work and Finding What Does - Our experience switching to AAS from Spelling Workout. www.learningmama.com Here is the whole Level 2, complete with all the cards I get to separate and assemble into my review box. I didn’t get to do that last time as the previous owner had done it for me. My daughter is curious what the “jail” is for. Is it for words she keeps spelling wrong? Or is for words that break the spelling rules? We will soon find out!

And it is worth noting that this curriculum is quite popular and holds it’s value well so I should be able to resell it when we are done. It is almost completely non-consumable as well, with the exception of the progress charts and certificates, which we don’t use anyway. So the cost of the program will be spread out between my three girls.  I would have had to re-purchase SWO workbooks for each child, so in the end, this one might actually be cheaper, and re-sellable!

Update:  I’ve now been using AAS for several years and am midway through Level 4 with my oldest (fourth grade) and preparing to start my first grader. It’s an excellent program — and it is now included in the recommended resources for the fourth edition of The Well-Trained Mind.